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In vitro Shoot Micro Propagation of Medicinal Applications and Ornamental Value of Cestrum nocturnum

Affiliations

  • Independent University, Bangladesh (IUB), Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (BCSIR), Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • Primeasia University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • BRAC University, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Abstract


Background/Objectives: Cestrum nocturnum L. a night Blooming jasmine belongs to Solanaceae family widely circulated all over tropical as well as subtropical areas of the World. It is mainly popular for ornamental fragrant flowering and hedge plant but also sometimes for traditional medicinal purpose. Due to strongest smelling characteristics of the plants, it is used in many industries for making Perfumes, essential Oils, Soaps, Candles, Body Oils, etc. The existence of natural plants of economic importance are threatened due to rapid urban development, including industrialization, residential development, educational, commercial etc., reduce the land for cultivation. Hence plant tissue culture protocol may be adapted for production and utilization of economically popular plants, including C. nocturnum involving limited space and short period of time. Methods: Shoot tip explants of naturally grown C. nocturnum were excised sterilized and endued on ‘Murashige and Skoog’ (MS) medium enriched changed concentration of BA, NAA, as well as GA3 singly or in combination. Excised micro shoots were examined for root development on 0.5 MS using IBA, NAA as well as IAA separately. Findings: The highest amount of multiple bud were observed in low concentration of BA (01.50 milligram × l-1), resulted no. of shoot 4.40 as well as 4.20/explant, no. of leaves 15.40 as well as 4.20/explant as well as size of different shoot 5.360 as well as 4.860 cm. The concentration of IBA and IAA were found to be best for root formation in micro shoots (13.20, 6.80 roots/micro shoots) as well as root size (8.39, 5.73 cm) individually. Application: There are many opportunity of plant tissue culture which offer marvelous chances in plant propagation, plant development as well as creation of plants with necessary agronomical features. Finally often hardening plantlets were gradually adjusted to natural condition and acclimatized with 90% success. This established protocol could help plant cell biotechnology, horticulture, medical and industrial sector of the country.

Keywords

Cestrum nocturnum, Micro Propagation, MS Salts Medium, Night Jasmine, Tissue Culture, Transplantable Plantlets

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